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Guitar: Tone Basics

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archM2x
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PostPosted: April 25th 2008, 04:27 Download Post

alright, for awhile i've been milling about on writing an actual informative topics regarding guitar and such, so here's my shot at it.

i would like to start off by addressing the basic building blocks of "tone". Recently we came across many people asking how to get that "J-Rock/Visual Kei" tone. In actuality there is no one tone that can encompass the broad range of styles covered any rock music, visual kei being as super vague as it is. what i hope to deliver are some tone basics, namely the eq section of your amp where the largest percentage of your tone comes from. Hopefully, readers will be able to find their own tones, or be able to make some based off of what they hear.

So let's begin.

Let's pretend that you are a total noob, and are staring at the control panel of your amp. What do all these knobs do? Well please allow me to break it down for you.

A standard eq section of an amp usually contains six controls. Master Volume, Gain, Bass, Middle, Treble, Presence. Some amps have more, some have less, some call them by different names, but each of these controls function about the same across the board. Here is a simple explanation of all the controls as simply as i can put them.

Master Volume: This control regulates the overall output volume of your amp, or channel in the case of a multi-channel amp. You can increase or decrease your volume with this control. But unlike the "Gain" control, the Master volume can increase volume while adding minimal distortion depending on the specs and capabilities of the amp.

Gain: This control is generally like a volume control but acts a bit differently. Like a Master Volume it has the ability to boost a signal, but instead of a clean boost, you begin to get break up or distortion.

*Note: In order to get clear, awesome tones, you need to find a perfect balance between your Volume and Gain. Too much Gain and your notes will be muddy and poorly defined. Too little volume and you're not likely to get power tube distortion if you're running a tube amp, or you just plain won't be heard. Never dime the Gain!!! Also, many people, when setting their clean tones, make the mistake of dialing the gain all the way down, and they are treated to a thin clean sound much lower in volume than their distorted channels. A decent amount of gain is necessary on your clean channel to get a full bodied clean sound at higher volumes. If you are experiencing a little bit of distortion on your clean sound, you may need to roll back the volume knob on your guitar.

Treble: To some people, name of this control, and others, is self-explanatory, but for the sake of this explanation i'll run through it. The treble control increases/decreases the volume of your higher range frequencies. This control makes shimmering cleans and country twang possible and is also able to roll off ear-piercing highs from your distortion. Too much highs and your tone will sound like an icepick to the ear, or a swarm of mosquitos. Too little, and you have mud.

Mid: This control is the most powerful control on many amps, largely because much of the guitars range falls in the "midrange" category. This control has the ability to increase/decrease your midrange frequencies. From bite to chunk, and fat to thin, your tone is largely dependant on what your amp does with your guitar's midrange frequencies.

Bass: Again, self explanatory. This control increases/decreases your low frequencies. With this control, your bass notes will sound tight, open, or non-existant. Wanna feel the earth shake as you play? Turn up that bass, but beware. Too much bass makes your tone "woofy" and has the potential to ruin the definition of your notes.

Presence: Like the Treble control, but it controls the super high frequencies. Almost inaudible to the human ear. Because it works in the frequency range that it does, this control is not as powerful as the bass, mid, and treble controls, but is important nonetheless. If your amp is shrill and fizzy, try rolling down the presence before working the treble control again. You may find that you didn't really have to mess with the treble any further.

Note: Imagine your tone is a train, and the frequencies are passengers. The more you amplify frequencies, the more people you add to the train. If there is a lot of midrange people on the train, the treble and bass people are going to naturally feel pushed aside. Take some of those midrangers out, and the treble and bass will have a bit more breathing room. Many metal musicians like to "scoop" their mids. This means dialing down the midrange so that the bass and treble are a little more prominent in the overall tone. Your low notes will sound tighter and big chords will sound a bit better defined, at the risk of your single notes sounding thin, especially the high notes, which may become brittle. Conversely, you may want to amplify midrange to your tone if you're a very solo oriented player who relies on single note lines most of the time. Many players who normally play scooped, throw an eq pedal in the mix to add midrange to their solos and take them away when they go back to rhythm.

Of course, all amps sound and act differently. Combine that with different guitars, different effects in the signal chain, voltage factors etc., and i assure you no one tone will sound the same on different amps. Sure you can get in the general area of someone else's tone, but the only way to truly have their tone is to have their equipment to the letter. Hopefully with this information and the information that follows you'll be able to find your own tones, and perfect the tone that you feel is lacking in what your hear from others.



If there are any questions, please feel free to post them, or contact me personally via AIM. My screenname is "archM2xGT".

Anything you disagree with please post, and we will discuss or consider making corrections. Also, if you notice any mistakes, please let me know.

If anyone else wants to add to these topics please feel free to:

Signal Chain basics
How pedals affect your tone
Rack units
Multieffects units
Digital vs Analog
Tube Preamps
Tube Power sections
Tube vs Solid State
Guitar tonewoods
Pickups: high output vs low output and in between
Voltages

This thread, as always, is open to free discussion.
Last edited by archM2x on April 25th 2008, 04:45; edited 1 time in total
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PostPosted: April 25th 2008, 04:36 Download Post

I wish I had this a few years ago. ._.

Oh and as a thought, you might want to make one for bass or whatever. But I know virtually nothing about that.
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PostPosted: April 25th 2008, 05:22 Download Post

A bass one would be good. Especially talking about technique, among other things.
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PostPosted: April 25th 2008, 15:29 Download Post

hot stuff. Very much appreciated arch.
I'll try to put up a tonewood one later.
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PostPosted: April 26th 2008, 15:27 Download Post

mm hmm. thank you i just started guitaring too but i cant play for awhile due to nerve damage >.<
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PostPosted: April 27th 2008, 19:47 Download Post

This describes body woods. The rest of this article found at the site describes neck, top and fretboard woods as well. This will help you guess at the guitar you want soundwise, but best advice is still to play before you purchase.

Taken directly from http://www.jemsite.com/jem/wood.htm



"Body Woods
Basswood:

Basswood is a soft wood with tight grains. Its relatively inexpensive of all the usual guitar woods, and it’s easy on router bits in the factory, easy to sand, and easy to seal and finish. The softness of basswood means that sharp highs are dampened and smoothened. That helps offset the tinny sound associated with knife edged tremolo contacts. The softness also fosters a weaker low end. It’s light in weight, but not because of large pores. Rather it’s low in mass overall. Deep, breathy sub-lows aren’t resonated in Basswood. The reduction in these outer frequencies leaves the mids pronounced in a hypothetical response curve. Its very suitable for the typical guitar range, and very suitable for lead guitar, because of its pronounced “out front” sound. Complex overtones are muted along with the highs leaving a strong fundamental tone.

Production notes: Japanese factories like Ibanez seem to get a tan colored, more uniform Basswood while other Asian factories get a more flawed yellowish basswood. And there seems to be a big difference in tone. A clearer, darker Basswood should produce more sound, while the yellowish lower grade seems to have more of the undesirable tonal qualities of Poplar. A hardtail emphasizes the reduced dynamics of the outer frequencies.

Alder:
Alder is light in weight with soft tight pores like Basswood. But there is a large swirling grain pattern to it with harder rings and sections. So imagine a Basswood type texture but with harder rings peppered throughout. That adds to the stiffness, and the complexity of the tones. It retains more of the highs that Basswood softens, but also gives some room to the lows. You have a broader spectrum of tones, which leads to the perception of a little less mids than Basswood.

Production notes: Not much difference between factories, production.

Swamp Ash:
Not to be confused with Northern “Hard Ash” Swamp Ash has huge, open pores with hard and soft layers within each ring of the tree. So you basically have a very rigid skeleton with open and softer pores throughout. It is very resonant across the whole frequency spectrum. It has clear bell-like highs, pronounced mids, and strong lows. It has some random combing away of mid frequencies, which will vary the sound per guitar more than Alder or Basswood. Two Ash bodies are more likely to sound more different from one another, whereas Basswood and Alder are more consistent. A heavier piece, or a piece from higher up on the tree will be more dead and lifeless. More dull sounding, because the wood is harder and more uniformly dense. So the sweetness of the soft open pores is gone, and left is the compressed sound of a rigid, non-responsive wood, without all the brightness and sustain of a harder wood or the openness of a softer wood.

Production notes: An Asian mass produced factory guitar should be checked for weight, and openness of grain if the finish allows. Ash used at the big factories has a higher ratio of poor pieces than with smaller boutique builders, or other US builders, probably because it is a US wood.

Mahogany:
Open grained with large pores, Mahogany has a more uniform grain pattern and density than Swamp Ash. Its density is constant within the ring and from one ring to the next. So it’s rigidity is inherent in its composition, not in a “skeleton” with soft sections in between. It’s constant density compresses the mids a little, and this can be considered a thick sound, because it does still produce good lows and low mids. Without the mids popping out, being responsive to dynamics, its more of a “wall of sound” Its not that it isn’t midrangey, because it resonates those guitar frequencies well, but its not as responsive to them as an Alder or Ash. It also combs away more upper midrange frequencies for a more nasal sound. It has a good balance of fundamental and overtones for higher register soloing. High notes are richer and thicker than Alder or Ash.

Production notes: There are many different kinds of Mahogany, and unless it has a sparkle to it like some of the Japanese and US guitars it will have a similar sound from one piece to the next. A nicer piece of mahogany has an iridescence to it usually combined with what looks like wide stripes, almost as if it’s been pieced together by multiple 1” strips. Catalog photos often reveal that the endorser gets a better piece than the production line.

Walnut:
A darker wood with Ash-like grains, but like mahogany, the density is uniform. It is harder and denser than Mahogany so the tone is brighter, but the open grains make for a complex midrange that seems to be compressed in some frequencies, but dynamic in others. There’s a nasal response to rhythms, while solo notes jump out. It has a lot of advantageous features of the other main guitar woods. It has a snappy attack and solid lows like Ash, but with smooth highs like Mahogany, and textured mids like Alder. The drawbacks are that it’s heavier, and more stubborn in its sound. It doesn’t respond to random pickup changes. The pickups have to be well suited to the guitar. A Walnut body will dictate the tonal signature of the guitar more than the other main woods. A heavy piece will dampen the mids to produce an overly nasal and lifeless sound, so it needs to be light and open grained enough to resonate the main guitar frequencies.

Production notes: Again watch for heavy pieces. The extra weight adds nothing good to the sound except perhaps more sustain. But sustain is abundant in Walnut already.

Koa:
Oilier than Mahogany or Walnut, its denser than Mahogany but not as bright as Walnut, due to its actual makeup. It’s an oilier wood like Rosewood, and that dampens some highs in the attack. But then its density makes up for it a little. Think of the highs as present, but compressed. They don’t jump out like glass breaking. They are more omnipresent. And they are more in the upper midrange than the highs. That’s either a very musical sound for someone interested in fundamental, or a less expressive sound for someone into playing hard picking blues.

Production notes: Koa is rare, and it’s expensive with dramatic price fluctuations. It’s often a high cost upgrade. Figured Koa is very expensive, more rare, and cut for tops.

Korina:
Somewhat of a “super-mahogany” or “mahogany deluxe” its grains are similar and so is its sound. It’s said to have a sweeter midrange, and be more responsive. Although the grains look similar the material itself is slightly less dense. So if it weighed more than a same-sized mahogany piece it would more likely be due to higher moisture content than higher density.

Production notes: Rarely used, it is more expensive and rare than garden variety Mahoganies. The price of a Korina guitar usually reflects this, plus a little extra markup.

Soft Maple:
Used extensively in Korea, it’s not as hard as hard maple. But it’s a little heavy, bright in the upper midrange, and dull sounding in the lows. The extreme snappy highs aren’t there either because the pores are so tight that the highs get compressed. Some redeeming qualities can be brought from it with the right pickups, if you like a brassy, searing upper midrange sound for the bridge or a dry, combed rhythm sound.

Production notes: Korean factories love it, for some reason it’s abundant and cheap for them. It’s harder on router bits than basswood, but they seem to be less concerned with clean, sharp cuts over there, indicating that they do not compensate with more frequent bit sharpening and replacement.

Hard Maple:
This wood “shouts”. It is loud with a strong upper midrange, bright highs, and tapered off but very tight lows. A pickup that produces good lows will find them in a Hard Maple body, but they will be tight and will not interact with a loud half stack.

Production notes: Very heavy and hard on tools, its rarely used in factories. It makes a good slim bodied guitar.

Spruce:
Very soft to the touch, it is extremely stiff for it’s overall density. Like Alder, it’s another wood with a hard skeleton and soft meat. So in a solid body, it will produce tremendous resonant, open midrange, while retaining high frequency attack, and having good low end breath. Because of the low density overall the sound wouldn’t be perceived as having less midrange than Basswood. The mids will be just as powerful and dynamic amidst the addition of clear highs and lows. Probably the most full frequency body material accepted.

Production notes: Rarely used because its softness requires a heavy finish, or a composite “shell” like the Parkers. The Parker isn’t the best representation of the sound of a Spruce body since there are many other unique construction methods and synthetics used in the Parker. Would work well with veneer caps or a top, and would offset some of the compressed sound you get with neck through construction.

Lacewood:
Lacewood is a true multi-density wood. The rum colored skeleton is hard like Koa or Walnut, and the fleshy, grayish tan interior portions like Alder. The dual densities will augment different tones, while combing others out. It’s brighter than Alder, and richer than solid maple.

Production notes: It can be difficult to finish, because the sections absorb finish differently. Oil finishes and heavy poly finishes work better than a softer nitrocellulose or acrylic lacquer. The lacquer finishes will sink over time telegraphing the grain.

Extended Range notes: Another wood well suited for extended lows. Its dual density provides a good skeleton for keeping the lows tight. There’s less of a tradeoff to the higher strings because of the warmth of the softer sections."
Last edited by Aliceauua14 on April 27th 2008, 19:51; edited 2 times in total
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PostPosted: May 2nd 2008, 01:21 Download Post

Puppet @ April 26th 2008, 15:27 wrote:
mm hmm. thank you i just started guitaring too but i cant play for awhile due to nerve damage >.<


What happened, pray tell?
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PostPosted: May 2nd 2008, 02:28 Download Post

uhhh i broke my left arm when i was 3-4 and during the summer my arm just started to lose function.
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the red line running up my arm is where ur alner nerve is and it controls movement of the pinky and ring finger its also affecting the rest of my arm. they sent electric thru my alner to make it move but the signal is blocked off. You can also notice my arm has a weird shape
that thing on my hand is to help me extend my pinky straight without it it will not extend but instead make a "claw"
Last edited by Puppet on May 2nd 2008, 02:30; edited 1 time in total
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PostPosted: May 2nd 2008, 04:05 Download Post

awww dude. I hope that gets better.
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PostPosted: May 2nd 2008, 04:08 Download Post

Wow, I remember Mustaine talking about hurting his arm someway.

I hope you do physical therapy and all sorts of gripping exercises to get yer arm strength back.

Good luck!
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PostPosted: May 2nd 2008, 04:37 Download Post

^ Lol..
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PostPosted: May 2nd 2008, 08:43 Download Post

^Jesus Christ, why did your parents let you out of your cage?
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PostPosted: May 3rd 2008, 01:04 Download Post

thanks missingno and alice :) as a matter of fact i AM going thru some physical therapy
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PostPosted: May 15th 2008, 03:25 Download Post

MISSINGNO. @ May 2nd 2008, 08:43 wrote:
^Jesus Christ, why did your parents let you out of your cage?


..........
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PostPosted: May 15th 2008, 05:57 Download Post

I'll take it that means he escaped...
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PostPosted: May 15th 2008, 06:58 Download Post

He's a slow one, too.
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PostPosted: May 29th 2008, 09:09 Download Post

Good idea for a thread.
I'm no pro. Been playing for a half-dozen years, but mostly stick to acoustic. Actually my knowledge of electrics is quite assy.

So, uh, easy topic.

Tube vs. Solid state amps.

The gist of this is that tube amps generally sound warmer. You may (read:will) have to change the tubes, which can be a pain. But, tube amps are generally said to sound richer/fuller, whereas solid state amps have a colder, less vibrant(?) sound. Which is fine for a lot of rhythm guitar.

If you plan on playing mostly lead, you might want a tube amp. That being said, there are many fine popular lead (and rhythm, of course) guitarists who use solid state (in some cases it might be preferable).

Someone can probably elaborate on this.

Personally, as a beginner I'd get a cheap-assed solid state for a variety of reasons (maintenance, transportation, tone)... but there's nothing quite like a big fat pinch harmonic through a hum to a sweet tube amp.

Feel free to correct anything wrong. As mentioned, electric is not my forté.
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PostPosted: May 29th 2008, 09:26 Download Post

Lead guitarist of Radiohead uses a SS amp.
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PostPosted: May 29th 2008, 12:38 Download Post

My Custom Audio OD-100 arrives today, finally! :D

So, yes, tube amps FTW.

Besides the warmth of tone as justanotherspider mentioned, tube amps respond to picking dynamics naturally in a way that solid state amps never will be able to do.

And yes, Radiohead's guitarist uses a solid state amp, but only for that mechanical distorted sound. I guess that's since that's exactly the sound he wants, it works for him. But keep in mind, he uses a Vox AC30 for the rest of the clean tones - and that's a tube amp of course.

Anyway, there's a reason that something like 99% of pros use tube amps still. And it has nothing to do with volume. Venues that they play at are more than adequately miked.
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PostPosted: May 29th 2008, 21:42 Download Post

^So basically he still uses the amp for his lead s***.

And then there are the people like BB King who use SS for all of their work, due to the SS clean supposedly being more sterile and....clean.

...And THEN there are people like Dimebag who play (borderline) annoying metal wankery nonsense with SS half stacks and endless distortion blah blah.

Guess it just depends on...the person. And the money they pull in.
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